BACC: Aid helps low-income students graduate

Benefits Access for College Completion (BACC)  will help low-income students get child care subsidies, food assistance and other aid in hopes they’ll stay in school, move more quickly to a credential and qualify for jobs that will make them self-supporting.

Seven community and technical colleges are participating in the three-year, $4.84 million initiative, which is funded by the Ford Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, Lumina Foundation, and the Open Society Foundations, and managed by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). The Annie E. Casey Foundation is also contributing.

The average full-time community college student had more than $6,000 in unmet need in 2011-2012 for school and living expenses, College Board estimates.  Among young community college students, 66 percent work more than 20 hours per week and 58 percent enroll part-time because of their work hours, lowering their odds of completion.

Cuyahoga Community College (OH), Gateway Community and Technical College (KY), LaGuardia Community College (NY), Lake Michigan College and Macomb Community College (MI), Northampton Community College (PA), and Skyline College (CA) are working with local human services agencies to provide services.

“These benefits, including health insurance, food, and child care, as well as financial aid, can help them to complete credentials and get into well-paying jobs,” said AACC President Walter G. Bumphus.


POSTED BY Joanne Jacobs ON September 21, 2012

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jamescameron

The colleges participating in the implementation phase of the project are: Cuyahoga Community College (OH), Gateway Community and Technical College (KY), LaGuardia Community College (NY), Lake Michigan College and Macomb Community College (MI), Northampton Community College (PA), and Skyline College (CA).

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