CC choice blamed for Latino graduation gap

Forty-six percent of Latinos who graduated from high-scoring public high schools enrolled in a community college, according to a USC study. That compares to 23 percent of their black classmates, 19 percent of Asians and 27 percent of white students. White and Asian students are much more likely to enroll at a four-year university.

Graduation rates are much lower for students who start at community colleges.

Table 1. College-Attendance Rates of California High School Graduates by Public Higher Education System and Race/Ethnicity, 2010

 

Community College Attendance Rate

CSU Attendance Rate

UC Attendance Rate

Latina/o

33.7%

9.8%

3.9%

Asian

25.9%

13.2%

25.0%

White

23.1%

8.7%

5.2%

African   American

24.5%

8.3%

3.7%

South Pasadena is known for excellent public schools. Of South Pasadena High’s 2010 Latino graduates, 71 percent went straight to community college, reports KPCC.  Only about a third of the school’s white and Asian graduates that year attended community college.

“Perhaps certain kinds of college pathways are promoted for different types of students,” said George Washington University education researcher Lindsey Malcom-Piqueux, who authored the study. “We know that tracking is real. We know that differential expectations for academic performance based on things like race and class are real.”

Lower-income students are more likely to choose to a low-cost community college, especially if their parents don’t understand financial aid options.


From Colorado: For low-income students, getting into college is only half the battle. Graduating is a challenge.


POSTED BY Joanne Jacobs ON January 10, 2014

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[…] Latinos who graduate from California’s high-scoring public high schools enroll in community co… at much higher rates than their black, Asian and white classmates, according to a new study. Asian-Americans and whites typically start at four-year colleges and universities, which cost more but have much higher graduation rates than community colleges. […]

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