Pell aid for dual-enrollment students?

Extending Pell Grants to dual-enrollment students would encourage low-income students to get a head start on college, advocates argued before a congressional briefing yesterday.  “For low-income students, they are essentially penalized for taking college early,” Adam Lowe, the executive director of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, told CollegeBound.

Dual-enrollment students are more likely to enroll in college and earn a degree, says Lowe.

In some states, dual-enrollment courses are free, but most charge students for some of the costs, Lowe said. 

Several financial-aid proposals are under discussion, including a recent report from the College Board, reports CollegeBound.

The U.S. Department of Education late last year asked for colleges willing to be experimental sites for new financial aid strategies, including giving high school students Pell Grant money to pay for college. The National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators recently suggested a promise of a Pell Grant in 9th grade would motivate students to pursue higher education.

It’s hard to estimate the cost of extending Pell coverage. About 1.4 million high school students are taking more than 2 million college courses across the country.


POSTED BY Joanne Jacobs ON May 2, 2014

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Jessica Jones

The system is already running in the red. If we are going to give money to students to help with college classes can’t we use that for AP courses instead?

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