Scaling up programs for low-skilled adults

Five Breaking Through community colleges have redesigned basic skills education to help low-skilled adults earn job credentials, reports Jobs for the Future in Achieving Ambitious Goals.

“Low-skilled adults” perform below the eighth-grade level on reading and math tests, though some have a high school diploma or GED.  Breaking Through colleges use four strategies — accelerating basic-skills instruction, offering comprehensive support services, connecting classes with employers and jobs, creating college and career pathways — to design programs customized to local needs.

>>Durham Technical Community College: 66 percent of Breaking Through students moved up to grade 9.0 or higher from 6.0 to 8.9 based on TABE scores, versus 56 percent of a comparison group. In math, 52 percent of Breaking Through students moved up to grade 9.0 or higher from 6.0 to 8.9, versus 41 percent of the comparison group. In reading, 63 percent of Breaking Through students moved up to grade 9.0 or higher from 6.0 to 8.9, versus 48 percent of the comparison group.

>>Lake Michigan College: 94 percent of Breaking Through scaling-up students completed the initial program they enrolled in, versus 62 percent of those in a comparison group; 94 percent completed a College Success course with a grade of C or better, versus 21 percent of the comparison group.

>>Owensboro Community & Technical College: 36 percent of Breaking Through students completed all phases of a career pathway; 26 percent earned a certificate.

>>Pamlico Community College: 84 percent of Breaking Through students completed Phase 1 of the career pathway, passing three GED tests; 66 percent of Breaking Through students completed the GED, or Phase 2 of the career pathway.

>>Tacoma Community College: 31 percent of Breaking Through students earned college-level credits within two quarters, versus 4 percent in the comparison group.

The report looks at how programs can be expanded to reach more low-skilled adults.

Adult-education advocates lobbied Congress for more funding on Monday, reports the Chronicle of Higher Education.  

A policy paper, “The Return on Investment (ROI) From Adult Education and Training,” also released on Monday, contends that billions of dollars could be earned, saved, and pumped back into the struggling economy as a result of investments in programs for work-force development.

McGraw-Hill Research Foundation and the National Council of State Directors of Adult Education produced the report.


POSTED BY Joanne Jacobs ON May 12, 2011

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[...] Also on Community College Spotlight: Some community colleges have redesigned basic-skill education to help low-skilled adults earn job credentials. [...]

Grace Machado

Hi my name is Grace Machado, looking for a program that can help me higher my education. I need some assistance in passing my GED and choosing the right career. I would like more information on your programs. Thank you

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