Skipping the BA was ‘smartest choice’

An excellent student from a blue-collar family in Canada, Kathy Shaidle didn’t go to university and doesn’t regret it, she writes on PJ Media. With a two-year media degree from a community college, she launched a successful career.

In an era of double-digit unemployment and interest rates, I got my first “real” job at a Toronto communications firm pretty easily, and paid off my relatively puny student loans in short order (unlike some of my friends, who got BAs — then declared bankruptcy).

Shaidle was the first in her family to finish high school. “Filling out applications, applying for grants, moving into a dorm — you might as well have been talking about a voyage to the moon.”  But, though her reasons for not going to university “sound pretty stupid,” she considers it “one of the smartest decisions of my life.”

Shaidle recommends Worthless: The Young Person’s Indispensable Guide to Choosing the Right Major by Aaron Clarey, aka Captain Capitalism.

Like me, Clarey’s been saying for years that BAs are today what high school diplomas used to be: that is, so commonplace that not having one makes no difference if you’re a genius, an energetic entrepreneur, or both.

Like me, he believes too many people are being pushed into getting a degree (i.e., brainwashed in junk science and political correctness at their own expense) when they should be learning a trade or just plain left alone.

And like me, Clarey thinks lots of would-be students should use the money they’re wasting on tuition as start-up capital instead.

For those who insist on seeking a bachelor’s degree, Clarey offers common-sense advice on which majors lead to a paying job and which will lead back to Mom and Dad’s house.


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[...] excellent student from a blue-collar family in Canada, Kathy Shaidle thinks not going to university was “one of the smartest decisions of my life.” With a two-year media degree from a community college, she launched a successful career and [...]

Aaron

It’s interesting to see how a perfectly valid “[four year] College wasn’t for me”, turns into a weakly reasoned screed that, in effect, [four year] college isn’t for anybody.

Kathy Shaidle

A “screed” is a passionate polemic written by someone you disagree with.

“Screed” or not, Aaron, I’m the one with all the books and bylines.

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