Study: Online learning boosts completion

Does Online Learning Help Community College Students Attain a Degree?  Yes, in some cases, concludes research by Peter Shea, an associate professor of education at the State University of New York at Albany.

Online community college students in Virginia and Washington state have higher failure and dropout rates, according to earlier studies by the the Community College Research Center.

Shea, who used to run SUNY’s online education system, found the CCRC’s conclusions “counterintuitive,”  he told Inside Higher Ed. Online education’s flexibility and convenience should help students advance, he believes.

In contrast to the CCRC studies, the Albany research found that students who had enrolled in at least one online course in their first year did not come into college with better academic preparation than did those who took no courses at a distance.

And students who took online courses at a distance were 1.25 times likelier to earn a credential (certificate, associate or bachelor’s degree) by 2009 than were their peers who had not taken any online courses. Those who started college with a goal of attaining a certificate (rather than a bachelor’s degree) and took online courses were 3.22 times as likely to earn a credential than were students who did not take online courses.

Shea used a nationally representative data set, he points out. Virginia and Washington state could be outliers.

Shanna Jaggars, a co-author of the Community College Research Center studies, said the Albany study may include more adult students.  “For older students who are working full-time and have children, the ability to maintain a full-time load by mixing in one or two online courses per semester may outweigh the negative consequences of performing slightly more poorly in each online course they take.”


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[…] Online learning raises completion rates for community college students, concludes a new study. That contradicts previous research, which found higher failure rates for online community college students in two states. […]

[…] According to research by University of New York professor Peter Shea, online learning does, in some cases, help boost college completion. But he also found that online community college students in Virginia and Washington have higher dropout rates. […]

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