Two-year colleges raise tuition by 6%

College tuition is rising, but so is financial aid, according to “Trends in College Pricing 2010” and “Trends in Student Aid 2010” by the College Board’s Advocacy and Policy Center.

* In-state, public four-year institutions: $7,605, a jump of $555 from the previous year, or just under 8 percent.

* Private nonprofit four-year colleges and universities: $27,293, an increase of $1,164, or about 4.5 percent.

* Public two-year colleges: $2,713, an increase of $155, or about 6 percent

* For-profit institutions: $13,935, up $679, or about 5 percent over the previous year.

College costs have outpaced inflation for the last decade. At public two-year colleges, cost have gone up 2.7 percent over inflation in 10 years, College Board reports.

Financial aid to undergraduates now averages $1,100 per student, writes Sarah Butrymowicz on the Hechinger Report. That includes a big jump in Pell Grants for low-income students. However, more students are taking out loans and many families are earning less.

More students are enrolling in college, says Sandy Baum, a co-author of the College Board reports.  However, as the federal government spends more on college aid, the states are spending less.

So it’s going to take greater effort on everybody’s part if we’re going to be able to provide the necessary funding to really get more students not only into college but also through college.

Federal aid is tied to financial need, while some states are subsidizing students who could afford to pay their own way, Baum says.


POSTED BY Joanne Jacobs ON October 29, 2010

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[…] Tuition is rising faster than inflation at colleges and universities, reports College Board.  Financial aid, such as grants for low-income students and tax credits for middle-income families, is rising too. […]

[…] Tuition is rising faster than inflation at colleges and universities, reports College Board.  Financial aid, such as grants for low-income students and tax credits for middle-income families, is rising too. […]

Patrick

Four year colleges and universities are not the only forms of higher education that has seen an explosion in tuition prices. Two year community colleges have been dramatically effected, as well. College costs have been increasing at a faster rate than inflation for many years. All the costs add up, students are being asked to pay for a lot. But why does it cost so much? Check out this article for the answer: http://j.mp/cizIMC

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